Tampa Bay Rays' Evan Longoria gets $100 million extension
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

St. Petersburg, Fla. • Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria has agreed to a new contract through 2022 that adds six guaranteed seasons and $100 million.

The agreement announced Monday with the three-time All-Star incorporates the remainder of the 27-year-old's existing contract, which called for him to earn $36.6 million over the next four seasons. The new deal includes a team option for 2023.

"We drafted Evan in 2006 with the belief that he and the organization would grow with each other and together accomplish great things," Rays principal owner Stuart Sternberg said in a statement. "That is why the Rays and Evan signed a long-term contract in 2008, and it is why we are extending our commitments. Evan has clearly become a cornerstone player and a fixture in our organization. We are proud of what we have accomplished these past seven years, and I expect the best is yet to come."

Just six games into his major league career, Longoria agreed in April 2008 to a $17.5 million, six-year contract that included club options potentially making the deal worth $44 million over nine seasons.

Tampa Bay selected Longoria as the third overall pick in the 2006 amateur draft, making him the first player drafted under Sternberg and Friedman.

"Evan has all of the attributes we seek in a player," Rays executive vice president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said. "His determination and work ethic inspire others around him. He is devoted to his craft and strives to improve himself every year, and he defines success in terms of team performance and achievement. It's exciting to know that Evan will be manning third base for the Rays for many years to come."

Tampa Bay selected Longoria as the third overall pick in the 2006 amateur draft, making him the first player drafted under Sternberg and Friedman.

Longoria played in just 74 games in 2012 because of a partially torn left hamstring. He underwent a minor procedure on the hamstring Nov. 20 and is expected to be ready for spring training.

Tampa Bay was 41-44 during Longoria's absence, and 47-27 with him in the starting lineup.

The two-time AL Gold Glove winner and 2008 AL Rookie of the Year ranks second on the Rays career list with 130 home runs, third with 456 RBIs and fourth with 161 doubles. Longoria is one of 11 active players to average at least 25 homers and 90 RBIs during his first five seasons.

Longoria will donate more than $1 million during the contract to the Rays Baseball Foundation, the team's charitable foundation.

Former San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera will receive a full postseason share of $377,003 after the World Series-winning team opted not to use him in the playoffs following a 50-game drug ban. The Giants, who swept the Detroit Tigers in four games last month to win their second World Series in three years, awarded 50 full shares out of a $23.5 million players' pool, 11.1 partial shares and 12 cash awards, Major League Baseball said in a statement.

Under baseball's Rule 45 on eligibility, Cabrera was automatically awarded a full share because he was on the roster after June 1 and eligible to participate in the World Series.

The $377,003 payout was a record. Full shares paid to Tigers' players were worth $284,275.

Cabrera was an All-Star who was batting .346 when he was banned for 50 games on Aug. 15 after testing positive for testosterone. He was reinstated to the Giants' 40-man roster on Oct. 12, though the team chose not to include him on their active lists for the National League Championship Series, which began Oct. 14, and the World Series.

Under baseball's Rule 45 on eligibility, Cabrera was automatically awarded a full share because he was on the roster after June 1 and eligible to participate in the World Series.

Cabrera signed a two-year contract with the Toronto Blue Jays this month. The deal is worth $16 million, according to the New York Post.

The postseason players' pool, which went to 10 teams, was $65,363,469, derived from 50 percent of gate receipts from wild- card games and 60 percent of gate receipts from the other series.

—Editors: Jay Beberman, Larry Siddons.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinsonbloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillupbloomberg.net