Not TOO LOUD
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

In 2010, Congress passed the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act, and as of last Thursday, Federal Communications Commission rules now "require commercials to have the same average volume as the programs they accompany."

I can't imagine a TV viewer not thankful that our members of Congress on both sides of the aisle finally, and overwhelmingly, agreed to stop LOUD COMMERCIALS. This is truly government for the people. For more than a half-century, TV and its inevitable loud commercials have been a part of American life. So what took Congress so long?

There must be some who see these new regulations as yet another example of big government intruding into the free marketplace — the Big Nanny once again telling businesses what to do.

And they're right. Commercial television broadcasters had 60 years to get this right, but they favored their paying sponsors more than their viewing public.

This is why we need government to check the marketplace; the free market won't address some problems on its own. And if regulators ever go too far, well, advertisers will complain to Congress, and you can bet the excesses will be trimmed.

We have an effective check on big government: an elected Congress.

Art Jones

Salt Lake City