GMO labeling
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

As a protester against Monsanto's genetically modified seeds, I apologize to Robert Paisley for failing to communicate why we are so alarmed ("GMOs everywhere," Forum, June 4).

By genetically modified organisms, we don't mean selectively bred critters, such as Big Boy tomatoes or Leghorn hens. We are worried about frankenfoods, where genes from one species are put into another.

For example, Bt corn gets a gene from bacillus thuringiensis, a bacteria that makes its own insecticide. So every time you eat Bt corn you are eating pesticide. No testing proves it's safe for people, but animal testing has turned up digestive, reproductive and allergy problems.

I don't want my granddaughter or me to eat products with built-in pesticide. But if we drink sodas sweetened with corn syrup or eat corn-fed beef, we will certainly run into GMOs, because more than 60 percent of corn acreage in this country is planted with Bt corn seeds.

GMO vendors spend millions to lobby Congress to stop the labeling of foods with GMO, so my family and yours can't choose to avoid them. If they are so proud of their products, why don't they want us to know about them?

Carole Straughn

Salt Lake City