Briefs from Tribune news services
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New search for Hoffa remains on old farm

Oakland Township, Mich. • The FBI has resumed its search for the remains of former Teamsters union leader Jimmy Hoffa, who was last seen alive before a lunch meeting with two mobsters nearly 40 years ago.

Federal agents returned Tuesday morning to a suburban Detroit field where they spent much of the day before digging. Reputed Mafia captain Tony Zerilli told his lawyer that Hoffa was buried beneath a concrete slab in a barn in the field. The barn no longer exists in the Oakland Township field about 25 miles north of Detroit.

Zerilli was in prison when Hoffa disappeared but he says he was informed about the whereabouts of the Teamsters boss after his release.

Authorities suspended the search late Tuesday afternoon, but expected to resume their efforts Wednesday.

Same-sex couples face housing bias

Washington • Same-sex couples are treated less favorably than heterosexual couples when seeking information about rental housing advertised over the Internet, according to a first-of-its-kind national study from the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The study, released Tuesday, found that gay and lesbian couples were less likely to receive a response to email inquiries about rental properties than straight couples. It also found that gay couples experienced discrimination slightly more often than lesbian couples.

HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan said the findings show a need "to continue our efforts to ensure that everyone is treated the same when it comes to finding a home to call their own, regardless of their sexual orientation."

Federal housing laws do not bar discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. But 20 states and Washington, D.C., have passed such laws.

Judge sets Fort Hood suspect trial for July 9

Fort Hood, Texas • Jury selection will start July 9 in the murder trial of the Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage.

The judge set the date after rejecting Maj. Nidal Hasan's request for a three-month trial delay. Col. Tara Osborn, the judge, says testimony will start Aug. 6 at the earliest.

Jury selection might be put on hold briefly if a jury consultant hired for Hasan's defense has to work on another case for a week.

Hasan faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole if convicted in the attack that left 13 dead on the Texas Army post.