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Say cheers to these three new Salt Lake City bars

Published April 17, 2017 9:19 am
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2017, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Raise a glass — or bottle — to three newcomers to the Salt Lake City bar scene.

One offers craft cocktails and a wine tower in an industrial setting. Another has Asian inspirations with a devilish name. And the last features a casual beer-bar setting from a name we already know.

Here's a snapshot of what you'll find at West Side Tavern, Purgatory and Lake Effect.



West Side Tavern and Cold Beer Store

For many years, the Utah Brewers Cooperative beer store has been a favorite place to pick up cold brews produced by Squatters and Wasatch. Now, instead of just buying beer to take home, customers can sit down in a 30-seat tavern, enjoy a drink and watch the bottling and canning line in action through large glass windows at one end of the bar. There are 24 beers on tap as well as higher-alcohol beers in bottles. Wine and spirits also are available. There's a small menu with appetizers — including Squatters' legendary Buffalo wings — a soup of the day and sandwiches. The tavern opened last December, but was only able to sell beer that was 4 percent alcohol by volume (that's 3.2 by weight). Last month, it received a club license from the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control and "now customers can drink all the beers we produce," said Doug Hofeling, the UBC's chief operating officer. 1763 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City; 801-466-8855. Open Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Purgatory

When the neighbors are a mortuary and motorcycle shop called Suicide Lane, a devilishly good name seems fitting. Owner Mai Nguyen purchased this empty brick warehouse at the same time she bought the building for her restaurant, Sapa Sushi Bar and Grill, next door. "The building has sat empty for years, but we always knew we wanted to put another restaurant or bar in the space," she said. The building recently was gutted and remodeled and has a casual feel with wood and touches of metal. There's a variety of beer, wine and cocktails as well as Asian-inspired small plates, several french fry variations — like the K-pop with Korean short ribs and caramelized kimchi — and hamburgers. Weekend brunch includes mimosas, Bloody Marys, a toast menu and for $8 there is "The Cure," a way to kill that hangover: dashi stock, buckwheat noodles, tempura veggies and a poached egg. Add pork belly for $2. 62 E. 700 South, Salt Lake City; 801-596-2294 or purgatorybar.com. Open Tuesday-Friday, 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.

Lake Effect

Lake Effect is an elegant bar with craft cocktails, a floor-to-ceiling glass wine display, and accents of dark wood, metal and exposed brick. Newly remodeled, it is across the street from the Salt Palace Convention Center — formerly The Hotel Bar and Nightclub — and is owned by Nick Chachas, a veteran of Gracie's and other Salt Lake City bars. There's live music and DJs every night and a menu with Spanish/Southwest influence, including tapas, tacos, carnitas and carne asada. There is a globally inspired burger menu as well. Get a Brazilian with fried egg, jamón, mozzarella and mustard aioli. Even with its multicultural menu, the name is decidedly Utah ­­— a nod to the Great Salt Lake's dynamic effect on Utah storms and weather patterns. 155 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City; 801-532-2068 or lakeeffectslc.com. Open daily, 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.

kathys@sltrib.com

 

 

 

 

 

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